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Online Journal of Interprofessional Health Promotion

Online Journal of Interprofessional Health Promotion

Abstract

Evidence-based practice is often acknowledged as important and has an understood value by health professional students and practitioners. The Commission for Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) adopted and integrated five core competencies into the new 2020 accreditation standards for Athletic Training education programs which strongly advocate for the inclusion of EBP. Hence, athletic training educators should work to embed EBP into curricula and clinical experiences through strategic planning and assessment to ensure educational goals and patient outcomes support the vision put forth by the CAATE. Furthermore, training preceptors to provide appropriate mentorship to athletic training students related to EBP is vital to improve the quality of EBP implementation during patient care. Recent evidence suggests while athletic trainers hold positive beliefs and attitudes towards evidence-based practice, there is still no evidence of wide-spread professional change. The disconnection comes when individuals return to clinical practice and do not engage in the process (Hankemeier & VanLunen, 2013; Keeley, Walker, Hankemeier, Martin, & Cappaert, 2016; Manspeaker & VanLunen, 2011; McCarty et al., 2013). Evidence indicates the most effective manner to teach EPB is early introduction followed by a progressive inclusion of skills over time and include a mentor-mentee relationship. Mentorship training for preceptors should include workshops that provide discussion about EBP, the process for carrying out EBP during patient care, and educational and rehearsal strategies for students and mentors to develop EBP skills and implement them into clinical practice. This integrated review provides a context for a forthcoming empirical study by this doctoral student at ULM.

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